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Myron Kuzmin
Myron Kuzmin

Cheapest State To Buy Cigarettes 2017



Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are the most frequently used tobacco product among U.S. youths, and past 30-day e-cigarette use is more prevalent among high school students than among adults (1,2). E-cigarettes typically deliver nicotine, and the U.S. Surgeon General has concluded that nicotine exposure during adolescence can cause addiction and can harm the developing adolescent brain (2). Through authority granted by the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) prohibits e-cigarette sales to minors, free samples, and vending machine sales, except in adult-only facilities (3). States, localities, territories, and tribes maintain broad authority to adopt additional or more stringent requirements regarding tobacco product use, sales, marketing, and other topics (2,4). To understand the current e-cigarette policy landscape in the United States, CDC assessed state and territorial laws that 1) prohibit e-cigarette use and conventional tobacco smoking indoors in restaurants, bars, and worksites; 2) require a retail license to sell e-cigarettes; 3) prohibit e-cigarette self-service displays (e.g., requirement that products be kept behind the counter or in a locked box); 4) establish 21 years as the minimum age of purchase for all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes (tobacco-21); and 5) apply an excise tax to e-cigarettes. As of September 30, 2017, eight states, the District of Columbia (DC), and Puerto Rico prohibited indoor e-cigarette use and smoking in indoor areas of restaurants, bars, and worksites; 16 states, DC, and the U.S. Virgin Islands required a retail license to sell e-cigarettes; 26 states prohibited e-cigarette self-service displays; five states, DC, and Guam had tobacco-21 laws; and eight states, DC, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands taxed e-cigarettes. Sixteen states had none of the assessed laws. A comprehensive approach that combines state-level strategies to reduce youths' initiation of e-cigarettes and population exposure to e-cigarette aerosol, coupled with federal regulation, could help reduce health risks posed by e-cigarettes among youths (2,5).




cheapest state to buy cigarettes 2017


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E-cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product among U.S. youths. E-cigarettes typically deliver nicotine, and the U.S. Surgeon General has concluded that nicotine exposure during adolescence can cause addiction and can harm the developing adolescent brain. In addition to federal regulation, states, localities, territories, and tribes maintain broad authority to adopt additional or more stringent requirements regarding tobacco product use, sales, marketing, and other topics.


As of September 30, 2017, eight states, the District of Columbia (DC), and Puerto Rico prohibited indoor e-cigarette use and smoking in restaurants, bars, and worksites; 26 states prohibited e-cigarette self-service displays; 16 states, DC, and the U.S. Virgin Islands required a retail license to sell e-cigarettes; five states, DC, and Guam had tobacco-21 laws; and eight states, DC, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands taxed e-cigarettes. Sixteen states had no such laws.


As of September 30, 2017, eight states, DC, and Puerto Rico prohibited indoor e-cigarette use and conventional tobacco smoking in worksites, restaurants, and bars (Figure 1). E-cigarette self-service display restrictions were the most commonly enacted of the five types of laws (26 states), followed by retail license requirements (16 states, DC, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) (Table). Tobacco-21 was the least common law, taking effect in California, Hawaii, and DC in 2016; in Maine, New Jersey, and Oregon in 2017; and in Guam in 2018. Eight states, DC, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands taxed e-cigarettes, with approaches varying by state. Five of these tax laws have been adjusted since enactment: California, Minnesota, and the U.S. Virgin Islands increased the tax rate, and Kansas and DC decreased the tax rate.


On October 23, 2017, New York became the ninth state to include e-cigarettes in its comprehensive smoke-free indoor air law. Thus, one third of the 27 states and DC with comprehensive smoke-free laws that prohibit conventional tobacco smoking in restaurants, worksites, and bars also prohibit e-cigarette use in these venues. Therefore, approximately 75.4% of the U.S. population (an estimated 243.6 million U.S. residents, including 55.7 million children) live in states in which bystanders can be exposed to secondhand e-cigarette aerosol in indoor public spaces. Previous research indicates that one in four U.S. middle and high school students reported past-month exposure to e-cigarette aerosol in a public place in 2015 (7). This exposure is of public health concern because the U.S. Surgeon General has concluded that e-cigarette aerosol is not harmless water vapor, and environmental studies have documented harmful and potentially harmful ingredients in secondhand e-cigarette aerosol, including nicotine, heavy metals, ultrafine particulate matter, and volatile organic compounds (2). Including e-cigarettes in comprehensive smoke-free laws can prevent involuntary exposures to secondhand e-cigarette aerosol, especially among vulnerable populations such as youths and pregnant women; simplify enforcement of smoke-free policies; and reduce the potential for the renormalization of tobacco product use (2).


FDA is authorized to regulate the manufacturing, sales, distribution, and marketing of tobacco products sold in the United States. In May 2016, the agency asserted jurisdiction over products that meet the definition of a tobacco product, including e-cigarettes. FDA generally cannot restrict public tobacco use, tax tobacco products, or establish a minimum age for tobacco sales above age 18 years (2). However, the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act ensures that localities, states, territories, and tribes can continue to play a central role in tobacco prevention and control policies by preserving their authority to regulate sales, marketing, advertising, and use of tobacco products by persons of any age. Thus, state, local, territorial, and tribal tobacco control strategies are an important complement to federal regulation, which can help reduce the public health risks of e-cigarettes, particularly among young persons (2).


The figure above is a map of the United States showing States and territories with and without laws prohibiting smoking and use of e-cigarettes in indoor areas of private worksites, restaurants, and bars, in the United States as of September 30, 2017.


The figure above is a bar chart showing the number of state and territorial laws regarding indoor public use, retail sales, and prices of electronic cigarettes, by year of enactment, as of September 30, 2017.


Background: Retail marketing surveillance research highlights concerns about lower priced cigarettes in neighborhoods with a higher proportion of racial/ethnic minorities but focuses almost exclusively on premium brands. To remedy this gap in the literature, the current study examines neighborhood variation in prices for the cheapest cigarettes and a popular brand of cigarillos in a large statewide sample of licensed tobacco retailers in a low-tax state.


Results: Approximately 84% of stores sold cigarettes for less than $5 and a Swisher Sweets cigarillo was available for less than $1 in 74% of stores that sold the brand. The cheapest cigarettes cost even less in neighborhoods with a higher proportion of school-age residents and Asian/Pacific Islanders.


Implications: Much of what is known about neighborhood variation in the price of combustible tobacco products focuses on premium brand cigarettes. The current study extends this literature in two ways, by studying prices for the cheapest cigarette pack regardless of brand and a popular brand of flavored cigarillos and by reporting data from the largest statewide sample of licensed tobacco retailers. Significantly lower prices in neighborhoods with a higher proportion of youth and of racial/ethnic groups with higher smoking prevalence are a cause of concern. The study results underscore the need for policies that reduce availability and increase price of combustible tobacco products, particularly in states with low, stagnant tobacco taxes.


The New York State Tobacco Control Program works to create communities open to policy, systems, and environmental changes that prevent tobacco and e-cigarette access by youth and eliminate exposure to toxic secondhand smoke and vaping aerosol. In addition to these state laws, many organizations, businesses, municipalities, and counties have adopted binding or nonbinding policies and resolutions that prohibit smoking and e-cigarette use. These policies include prohibiting smoking and e-cigarette use in multiunit housing; banning smoking, tobacco use, and e-cigarette use in additional outdoor spaces; restricting the number and location of stores that sell tobacco and e-cigarettes; prohibiting the acceptance of tobacco company funds or services; and working to reduce the impact of adolescent exposure to smoking in movies and on the internet.


NYS has one of the highest state cigarette taxes in the country. In 2010, NYS's cigarette excise tax increased to $4.35 per pack of 20 cigarettes or little cigars. The tax on moist snuff is $2.00 per ounce, and the tax on cigars and other tobacco products is 75% of wholesale value. Localities may levy additional tobacco taxes with the approval of the state legislature. New York City (NYC) also imposes a local tax on cigarettes at $1.50 per pack, bringing the combined state and local tax to $5.85, the third highest in the nation. As of June 1, 2018, NYC Local Law 145 requires retailers sell cigarettes for a minimum retail price of $13.00 per pack, the highest pack price in the U.S.


As shown in Table 2, the average price for the cheapest cigarette pack regardless of brand was $4.33 (SD = 0.97). More than three in four (83.5%) stores sold cigarettes for less than $5. The average price for a flavored Swisher Sweets cigarillo was $0.93 (SD = 0.30). Of the stores that sold this brand, 73.0% charged less than $1. Even after removing outliers, the maximum price for the cheapest cigarette pack was 6.6 times greater than the lowest price. The maximum cigarillo price was 10.5 times the lowest price. 041b061a72


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